Country Living
Country Living, Country Skills
Country People

KountryLife.com - A Country Living Resource and Community
Community
Message Board
Country Topics
Trading Post
Memory Lane
Country Skills
Country Cooking

Channels
Gardening
Livestock
The Kitchen
Machinery
Tools

Photographs
Photo Gallery
Vintage Photos
Special Collections

Fun
Country Humor
Country Sounds
Coloring Book
Interactive Story

Farm Tractors
Pictures
Tractor Parts
Tractor Manuals

Miscellaneous
Classic Trucks
Antique Tractors
Modern Tractors
Site Map
Links Page
Contact Us

  
Country Discussion Topics
To add your comments to this topic, click on one of the 'Reply' links below.

Greetings, white elm, firewwod?
[Return to Topics]

Michael M    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:22:10       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Greetings All,
My name is Michael M, really is. I am new here. My good friend, in real life, Old John, refered me to this site and list. Seems to be a really interesting and informative place.
I live in the middle of 20 acres of timberland, in the middle of thousands of acres of timberland, in Southern Indiana, in hilly Brown County. I am early retired, and spend most of my time cutting wood, from dropping the trees to finish work. I own and operate a WoodMizer.
I built my home myself, and I heat it with firewood, using a Brunco wood furnace. It works very well, or as good as the wood that I put in it.
I have a question for you all. How is white elm as a firewood, usually? I normally only cut down or cut up dead trees on my place for firewood, as I cultivate the healthy ones for timber. Last weekend I continued this by cutting down a fairly large, dead, white elm tree. The wood is very strandy, and it was standing dead for at least a year or so. It seems to burn ok, but also seems to make a lot of creosote, especially compared to it's relative, red elm.It also seems to burn a lot more slowly, and not as hot. Standing dead red elm is one of the best firewoods we have around here, and I just went through a couple of ricks of it.
Anyway, thanks in advance for any information concerning firewoods.
Good to be here.
Michael M


Sedona    Posted 09-26-2008 at 08:32:26       [Reply]  [Send Email]
I did not have much luck burning punky maple last winter, Didn't
burn very hot & the stove needed cleaning every 2 weeks. Lots of
creosote build up. I still have alot of that wood leftover. Any ideas
for what I can do with it?
Also have punky boards left outside for over 18 years. What should
I do with them?

thanks


Dave Smith    Posted 02-13-2004 at 13:27:32       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Michael, Contact you're local extension service. They may have a forester that will come and give you guidence. Tell him what you are doing. Making lumber and fire wood. You might find that is better to sell the elm logs (Used often in blocking) and what to cull for you're purpose.
Dave <*)))><


Old John    Posted 02-13-2004 at 07:31:24       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi Michael,
Welcome to the list.
You know I'm kind of a newby myself.
Good stuff here though.
You can get most questions about the Country Living answered.
Easy way to pass the Morning..........
Good down to earth Folks, "mostly" with a good sense of Humor.
Talk to you later...........
'til Later........
Old John


Salmoneye    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:51:11       [Reply]  [No Email]
Though Elm is not up there with White Oak or Sugar Maple foir BTU's it is still pretty good...I find it to hold an incredible amount of water though...When fresh it is some seriously heavy stuff...Once the water content is down to burnable levels it is fairly light in comparison to Maple...I find it needs a solid year (if not more) bucked up and split in order to be dry enough...Standing dead it will hold alot more water than you would think, and alot more than other woods do standing dead...

As stated, it is one bugger to split...Stringy as heck...


Salmoneye    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:46:08       [Reply]  [No Email]
Though Elm is not up there with White Oak or Sugar Maple foir BTU's it is still pretty good...I find it to hold an incredible amount of water though...When fresh it is some seriously heavy stuff...Once the water content is down to burnable levels it is fairly light in comparison to Maple...I find it needs a solid year (if not more) bucked up and split in order to be dry enough...Standing dead it will hold alot more water than you would think, and alot more than other woods do standing dead...

As stated, it is one bugger to split...Stringy as heck...


Dave 2N    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:43:37       [Reply]  [Send Email]
My experience with elm has been that it makes OK firewood if you get it at the right stage of seasoning; too soon and it will still be too green and too late, it begins to turn "punky" rather quickly. So it's OK but definitely not oak, ash, maple or locust.


KellyGa    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:40:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
Welcome Micheal. I haven't the foggiest about the wood, but I am sure somebody on here knows. People on here know a lot. This site is a wonderful place to sit and drink your coffee in the mornings and catch up. Nice after supper place too. :) Ignore the troll postings below. That is not a usual thing here. Kim will have that deleted and taken care of soon I hope.

Anyway, this is about the friendliest bunch around. Good friends. Hope you stay and give us some advice and stories along the way. :)


Michael M    Posted 02-13-2004 at 07:16:28       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hi Kelly,
Yep, my friend Jon has been telling me a lot about this site. I am really enjoying it so far.
I have no problem ignoring the trolls. Like any other parasite, unfed, it will dry up and blow away.
Best,
Michael M


mike    Posted 02-13-2004 at 06:35:46       [Reply]  [No Email]
not farmilliar w/ brunco furnace. Is it an outdoor wood furnace like my Taylor? Anyways the white elm you are talking about is good wood. Best way I've found to split it is chunk it up green and then split it in the winter when it is frozen. Still miserable stuff to split


Michael M    Posted 02-13-2004 at 07:22:42       [Reply]  [Send Email]
Hey Mike,
My Brunco is an indoor furnace. Works like any other central heat furnace, but uses wood for fule.
I am learning quickly that the elm needs to be good and dry to burn well. I use a hydraulic log splitter, kind of a home made deal, with a 5 hp engine and a 5000 lb. ram. It splits the elm ok, but it is one of the more difficult woods I have split.


[Return to Topics]



[Home] [Search]

Copyright © 1999-2013 KountryLife.com
All Rights Reserved
A Country Living Resource and Community