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Country Discussion Topics
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LEAKING BLOCK BASEMENT WALL
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JAMES COSENZA    Posted 02-17-2004 at 07:45:38       [Reply]  [Send Email]
SIRS'

MY BASEMENT CORNER WALL LEAKED.
I DUG THE OUTSIDE WALL DOWN ABOUT FIVE FOOT,AND FOUND CRACKS 12 TO 15 INCHES LONG AND 1/4 INCH WIDE. I FILLED THE CRACKS WITH HYDROLIC CEMENT AND
COVERED THE CRACKS WITH ASPHALT.
THIS LASTED ONE GOOD YEAR. THEN THIS WINTER 2004
WITH A LITTLE THAWING THE SAME PLACE LEAKS AGAIN.

IF ANYONE HAS A SOLUTION TO THIS PROBLEM, I'M MORE THAN WILLING TO LISTEN.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH

JAMES COSENZA


Dave in Mo    Posted 02-20-2004 at 09:46:24       [Reply]  [No Email]
I've never seen a basement that DIDN'T leak....eventually. No matter how the outside is landscaped, the watertable will determine the pressure. On all of my houses, I've trenched out about 2" the entire floor periphery and lead off to the floor drain. Small moulding covers up the "moat".............works great!


PatM    Posted 02-17-2004 at 12:43:13       [Reply]  [No Email]
TB makes a good point, and relatively inexpensive! You should also make sure you have a good slope away from the house, 1/4" per foot minimum, provided you have the room.


Red Dave    Posted 02-17-2004 at 08:44:36       [Reply]  [No Email]
Apparently there is movement that is causing the cracks. Frost will do that and there isn't much that will stop it. I know a guy who dug down the outside of his wall, then backfilled with clean, crushed stone, then he covered the trench with several layers of heavy duty plastic to keep water and fine silt from getting into the crushed stone. He then put a layer of topsoil on the top. The idea was that the crushed stone would give and absorb the movement of the ground, protecting the wall. The stone has to be clean though, fine dust will hold moisture, freeze solid and push anything.
Maybe something similar would work for you. I'd consider adding a layer of heavy plastic right against the wall too.
When I built my house, I graded everything away from the basement walls. I figure that the only way to keep water out is to keep it from getting to the wall, because if you get the water against it, sooner or later it'll find a way through.



You aint gonna like it...    Posted 02-17-2004 at 08:37:16       [Reply]  [No Email]
The only thing I have ever seen really work in that situation is installation of a 'French Drain' down near the footing...

Sometimes (read almost never) a French Drain or relandscaping at the surface will work...

Look up 'french drain' in a Google search...

Then get out your wallet...

Salmoneye, Who Wishes He Had Better News



Bob/Ont    Posted 02-17-2004 at 19:18:22       [Reply]  [Send Email]
It depends a lot on the soil he has Salmoneye. Our house has no weeping tile around the old part. The soil is fine sand and I banked up the wall giving trouble so the water wouldn't run against the house and it stopped. Here if you keep the water 3 feet from the wall it will stay dry all year round. Anything new has to have weeping tile though.
Later Bob


TB    Posted 02-17-2004 at 08:32:23       [Reply]  [No Email]
Our basment leeks when spring thaw hits found it is not neer as bad if we cleer the piles of snow and an area about 3 ft away from all along the house before things start to melt


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